Friday, July 20, 2018

Cellar Tour and Massive Tasting at Domaine Rolly-Gassmann in Rorschwihr, Alsace, with Pierre Gassmann - Germany-South and Alsace 2017 Tour by ombiasy WineTours

Picture: Cellar Tour and Massive Tasting at Domaine Rolly-Gassmann in Rorschwihr, Alsace, with Pierre Gassmann

The Domaine Rolly-Gassmann came into existence in 1967 with the marriage of Marie-Thérèse Rolly and Louis Gassmann. But Domaine Rolly-Gassmann is by no means a newcomer in Alsatian viticulture. The Gassmanns can trace back their viticultural roots to 1611 and the Rolly family to 1676. Today the Domaine is managed by son Pierre Gassmann. 

Domaine Rolly-Gassmann has 150 acres of vineyards which is quite big for an Alsatian family domaine. There are no Grand Cru sites in and around Rorschwihr but several excellent ”lieu-dit”. The style of the Rolly-Gassmann wines is opulent, lush, ripe, and very often with a fair bit of residual sugar. The Domaine’s philosophy is to wait for physiological and phenolic maturity in the fruit even with some botrytis. 10% of their production is Pinot Noir, and their Pinot Noir belongs to the best what Alsace has to offer.

Pierre Gassmann was our host.

We started with a tour of the winemaking facilities, followed by an exceptional portfolio tasting comprising 36 wines. Pierre Gassmann spent a lot of time explaining to us his biodynamic approach. A major extension project is underway and we had a chance to take a look at the construction side.

Pictures: Welcome at Domaine Rolly-Gassmann in Rorschwihr, Alsace

Barry Bros and Rudd on Domaine Rolly Gassmann

Barry Bros and Rudd: Located in Alsace’s Haut-Rhin village of Rorschwihr, near Ribeauvillé, lies the family domaine of Rolly-Gassmann, whose roots date back to 1661. The 51 hectare estate (40ha in Rorschwihr, 10ha in Bergheim) is owned and run by Marie-Therese (pictured right), Louis & their son Pierre Gassmann, along with a team of 17 workers.

They work to the principles of biodynamic viticulture yet curiously also apply weed killers. They produce on average 300,000 bottles per annum and they are notable for having more than four years’ stock (1 million bottles) in stock at any one time, which would account for the regular visits by French customers; they only export 20% of their annual production.

Picture: Louis Gassmann, Domaine Rolly-Gassmann

The 250ha commune of Rorschwihr, first noted for its wine in 742AD, lies on one of Alsace’s many faultlines (ala Burgundy), giving rise to a complex tapestry of 21 different soil types, particularly limestone, sandstone, granite and silt. So complex in fact that when the authorities sought to lump together vineyards to form large plots as part of the new Grand Cru system (1970s/80s), the villagers rose up and declared that either there would be 12 Rorschwihr Grand Crus or none at all. Hence today there are no Grand Crus in Rorschwihr.

That said there are some standout Crus/lieux-dits that would surely qualify as Premier Cru sites if ever this classification was tabled. Limestone rich vineyards Silberberg, Kappelweg & Pflaenzerreben are rated for their Rieslings , Rotleibel’s darker brown clay and silt soils are meant for Pinot Gris, while the oolithic white lime stone of Oberer Weingarten & Stegreben are perfect for the Gassmann’s Gewurztraminer.

Vinification takes place in large oak barrels and stainless-steel, giving wines of great elegance, gentleness and drinkability.

Pictures: Domaine Rolly-Gassmann Going Biodynamic

Tim Lembke of Cheap Wine Ratings: Rolly Gassmann - Amazing wines from Alsace

Tim Lembke of the Cheap Wine Ratings Blog and his wife participated in part of the tour, including the visit of Domaine Rolly-Gassmann. He wrote about it on his blog: 

Pictures: Tim Lembke and his Wife Robyn Bancroftat Weingut Hunn, with Annette Schiller, Kilian Hunn and Martina Hunn. See: Tasting and Cellar Tour at Weingut Hunn in Gottenheim, Tuniberg, Baden, with Kilian and Martina Hunn - Germany-South and Alsace 2018 Tour by ombiasy WineTours: Baden, Alsace, Pfalz and Rheinhessen

Tim Lembke: It has been a few weeks since I’ve posted anything here, the reason being that I’ve been off traveling. Some of that travel has been for my day job, but some has been wine-related travel to Germany and Alsace, France. One of the producers I visited on that trip was Rolly Gassmann, in Rorschwihr, France, where we spent a couple hours tasting wines and talking with Pierre Gassmann, going through 39 of the wines they produce. Yes, 39 wines! They have a huge portfolio.

They produce some pinot noir, but most of their wines are whites like riesling, pinot blanc, muscat, pinot gris and gewurztraminer. And those whites were absolutely amazing. I would even say one of the wines, the Riesling de Rorschwihr, Selection de Grains Nobles, was hands down the best riesling I’ve ever tasted in my life. Although that one was 100 Euros per bottle, so a bit out of my price range. That said, they offer many other wines at very reasonable and affordable prices.

Pictures: In the Cellar with Pierre Gassmann, Domaine Rolly-Gassmann

I found Pierre Gassmann to be an interesting producer as well. He applies biodynamic practices in his vineyards, although Rolly Gassmann isn’t certified as biodynamic. However, he is a founding member of Vignes Vivantes, an association of producers in Alsace who share knowledge of vineyard practices that preserve and strengthen the terroir.

Pierre Gassmann explained his biodynamic practices better than anyone I’ve heard before. The explanation of biodynamics often sounds like a blend of organic production, marketing and hocus pocus. But as Gassmann explained it, he’s trying to do things that make the vines strong, healthy and able to naturally defend themselves from pests and disease.

Pictures: Domaine Rolly-Gassmann Extension Project

In one of his buildings he had skids covered with herbs drying that he uses to make “teas” for the vines. He also explained the technique of placing a cow horn filled with manure in the vineyards. I’ve heard about this before and it’s one of the practices that makes biodynamics sound like superstition, but Gassmann explained that the intent of this technique is to attract certain fungi to the horn in order to keep them off the vines.

He also talked extensively about the soil types in his vineyards and explained that there are over 20 different soil types in the region. Gassmann chooses which vines to plant in which parts of his vineyards based on the soil type. And then uses his experience and knowledge of those soils to guide his vineyard practices as well as the wine production. He knows that grapes from different soil types will require different time to ferment — for example, grapes from a limestone soil type will require longer to ferment than grapes from a granite soil type.

Another part of Gassmann’s approach that was interesting is he doesn’t try to make each vintage of his wines the same. Rather, he works with what the vines give him and make the wine as he thinks will be best each vintage. So a riesling from the same plot may result in wine that is sweeter one year and drier wine the next year.

Across the board, his wines were great — ranging from really, really good to absolutely mind blowing!

In terms of the bargains to be found, there wasn’t a single riesling, sylvaner, auxerrois, pinot gris or gewurztraminer I didn’t like. And several of them were under $20.

I struggled with their pinot noir, although to be fair I don’t know if that was due to the pinot noir or if my palate wasn’t ready for them. We started those right after an extensive riesling tasting and I felt as though my palate never adjusted to the pinot noir.

Pictures: Tasting with Pierre Gassmann, Domaine Rolly-Gassmann

A few highlights from my tasting notes are:

2014 Moenchreben de Rorschwihr, Auxerrois

The nose is bright with herbal and lemon characteristics. The palate is quite bright from the acidity and delicious, offering rich citrus flavors. ~$17.00

2011 Silberberg de Rorschwihr, Riesling

Intensely floral on the nose with some passion fruit and slight petrol aromas. The texture is really rich, with a slight tingling feeling. Concentrated citrus and melon flavors. ~$19

2010 Pflaenzerreben de Rorschwihr, Riesling

Very aromatic, offering floral, citrus and mineral aromatics. Quite complex on the palate, with rich flint and citrus flavors. ~$25

If you’re ever traveling to Alsace I’d suggest arranging a visit to Rolly Gassmann — and stock up on their wines. They are in the process of building a new winery building, including a new tasting room.

They are imported to the US, so you may be able to find some of their wines here at boutique wine shops.

The Wines we Tasted


Sylvaner


Auxerois


Riesling


Pinot Noir


Muscat


Pinot Gris


Gewurtztraminer


Lunch at Restaurant L’Auberge Alsacienne in Châtenois

Following the massive tasting at Domaine Rolly-Gassmann, we had a light Alsatian lunch at Restaurant L’Auberge Alsacienne in Châtenois.


schiller-wine: Germany-South and Alsace 2018 Tour by ombiasy WineTours: Baden, Alsace, Pfalz and Rheinhessen - All Postings (Published and Forthcoming)

The Sun-Kissed South: Germany’s Pinot Noir, the Other Whites, the Culinary Regions - Germany-South and Alsace 2018 Tour by ombiasy WineTours: Baden, Alsace, Pfalz and Rheinhessen

Sekt: Cellar Tour and Tasting at Griesel&Compagnie, Sekthaus Streit, Bensheim, with Winemaker Rachele Crosara - Germany-South and Alsace 2018 Tour by ombiasy WineTours: Baden, Alsace, Pfalz and Rheinhessen

Lunch at 1 Michelin Star Restaurant Landhaus Feckl in Ehningen, with Chef Franz Feckl and Host Manuela Feckl - Germany-South and Alsace 2018 Tour by ombiasy WineTours: Baden, Alsace, Pfalz and Rheinhessen

The Evolving Structure of the Wine Industry in Germany – The Case of the Lake Constance Region

Schloss Salem at Lake Constance in Germany: A Museum, a School and a Wine Estate

Visit of Schloss Salem, Kirche Birnau and Weingut Markgraf von Baden - Germany-South and Alsace 2017 Tour by ombiasy WineTours

Cellar Tour and Tasting at Staatsweingut Meersburg in Meersburg, Baden, Lake Constance (Bodensee) - Germany-South and Alsace 2018 Tour by ombiasy WineTours: Baden, Alsace, Pfalz and Rheinhessen

2 Cellar Tours and 1 Tasting at Weingut Ziereisen in Efringen, Markgräfler Land, Baden, with Hanspeter and Edel Ziereisen - Germany-South and Alsace 2018 Tour by ombiasy WineTours: Baden, Alsace, Pfalz and Rheinhessen

Cellar Tour and Tasting at Pinot Noir Star Producer Weingut Martin Waßmer in Bad Krozingen, Markgräfler Land, Baden - Germany-South and Alsace 2018 Tour by ombiasy WineTours: Baden, Alsace, Pfalz and Rheinhessen

Dinner at Restaurant Schwarzer Adler, 1 Star Michelin, Oberbergen, Kaiserstuhl, Baden - Germany-South and Alsace 2017 Tour by ombiasy WineTours

Tasting and Cellar Tour at Weingut Hunn in Gottenheim, Tuniberg, Baden, with Kilian and Martina Hunn - Germany-South and Alsace 2018 Tour by ombiasy WineTours: Baden, Alsace, Pfalz and Rheinhessen

The World Class Wines of Alsace

In the world class white wine region Alsace

Tour and Tasting at Domaines Schlumberger in Guebwiller, Alsace - Germany-South and Alsace 2017 Tour by ombiasy WineTours

Cellar Tour and Tasting at Domaine Rieflé-Landmann in Pfaffenheim, Alsace, with Paul Rieflé - Germany-South and Alsace 2017 Tour by ombiasy WineTours

Cellar Tour and Massive Tasting at Domaine Rolly-Gassmann in Rorschwihr, Alsace, with Pierre Gassmann

Cellar Tour and Tasting at Domaine Pfister in Dahlenheim, Alsace, with Melanie Pfister

Dinner at 2 Michelin Star Restaurant Auberge du Cheval Blanc, Alsace

Wine Tasting at Weingut Friedrich Becker – Germany-South Wine Tour by ombiasy (2014)

Vineyard Tour and Massive Tasting at Weingut Siener in Birkweiler, Pfalz, with Owner/ Winemaker Peter Siener

Schiller's Favorite (Wine-) Restaurants in Deidesheim in the Pfalz, Germany

Dinner Tasting at the Vinothek/ Wine Tavern of Weingut Bürklin-Wolf, with the Managing Director of Weingut Bürklin-Wolf, Steffen Brahner

Extensive Vineyard Tour and Tasting at Weingut Reichsrat von Buhl in Deidesheim, Pfalz, with
General Manager Richard Grosche

Tasting and Cellar Tour at Weingut Battenfeld-Spanier/ Kühling-Gillot in Hohen-Sülzen, Rheinhessen, with Carolin Spanier

Cellar Tour and Tasting at Weingut Wagner-Stempel in Siefersheim, Rheinhessen, with Oliver Müller and Cathrin Wagner

Cellar Tour, Tasting and Lunch at Weingut Schloss Westerhaus in Ingelheim, Rheinhessen, with the Owners Countess and Count von Schönburg-Glauchau and Technical Director Toni Frank

Tasting at Weingut Knewitz in Appenheim, Rheinhessen

Schiller’s Favorite Wine Taverns in Mainz, Germany



Wednesday, July 18, 2018

A View from New York: 2016 Dry German Rieslings: Graceful, Resonant, Delicious - New York Times, Eric Asimov

Picture: The American Flag at Weingut von Winning in Deidesheim, Pfalz. See: Tour and Tasting at Weingut von Winning in Deidesheim, Pfalz – Germany-South Tour by ombiasy WineTours (2015), Germany

With his weekly column in the New York Times, Eric Asimov is one of the most influential wine crities in the USA. A few weeks ago, on May 3, 2018, he issued an article about dry German Rieslings. With the American consumer only slowly discovering the "New Germany", which is red, dry and sparkling (See: The New Germany – Red, Dry, Sparkling: German Wine Society Tasting, led by Annette Schiller, at Restaurant Old Europe in Washington D), this was a very welcome article. Unfortunately, Eric Asimov does not seem to be fully on top of what is going on in Germany in terms of wines.

Germany is moving to a terroir-based classification, similar to the one of Burgundy, away from the ripeness-of-the-grapes-at-harvest-based classification of the German Wine Law of 1971. This has nothing to do with simplifying the German system of wine labels. It is driven by climate change, which is transforming Germany - in terms of the ripeness of the grapes at harvest - from a marginal producer to a mainstream producer. Getting the grapes ripe in Germany's vineyards has moved from being the central to a side issue. As a result, the terroir has moved to the front and the sweetness of the grapes at harvest has moved to the back. The new terroir-based classification reflects these developments during the past few decades.

Picture: Annette Schiller and Klaus Peter Keller, Weingut Keller. See: VDP.Rheinhessen Invited to a Gala Dinner: The World Class Wines of the VDP.Rheinhessen Winemakers and the World Class Food of Philipp Stein (1 Star Michelin, Favorite), with Klaus Peter Keller, Philipp Wittmann, H.O.Spanier, Caroline Gillot-Spanier and Other Rheinhessen Stars

Leading the push towards a new classification is the VDP, the association of about 200 elite producers in Germany. The VDP has designed a Burgudny-style classification for its members, which, like in Burgundy, comprises 4 quality levels: Gutswein, Ortswein, Erste Lage, Grosse Lage - Bourgogne, Villlage, Premier Cru, Grand Cru. Within each category, you have different sweetness levels of the wine: Trocken, Kabinett, Spätlese, Auslese, etc, with Kabinett being sweeter than Trocken, Spätlese being sweeter than Kabinett, etc. The Grosses Gewächs (GG) is the Trocken wine from a Grosse Lage vineyard. In fact, the term is redundant - Grosse Lage Trocken should suffice - but has become very popular among German wine lovers.

This classification applies to both sweet-style and dry wines (and not only to dry wines as the Asimow article implies) as well as to white wines and to red wines. It is supposed to be a comprehensive classification.

The large majority of non-VDP producers, in particular the young producers, are following the lead of the VDP. Most commen is a 3-tier classification with Gutswein, Ortswein and Lagenwein - Estate Wine, Village Wine and Single Vineyard Wine.

I have written quite a bit about the new German classificatio  system, which is evolving. It is work in progress. The next step is probably a reform of the German Wine Law of 1971, with a view of bringing it in line with what the VDP is doing.

Certainly, this is not an issue of simplifying the German labeling.

Picture: Christian Schiller with Eva Fricke, Weingut Eva Fricke, Rheingau. See: A German Riesling Feast in New York City: Rieslingfeier 2015, USA

Here is Eric Asimov's article:

2016 Dry German Rieslings: Graceful, Resonant, Delicious

By ERIC ASIMOV MAY 3, 2018

People have complained forever about the complexity of German wine labels. Aside from the unfamiliarity of the language, the terminology is used almost nowhere else and does not always make intuitive sense.

Paradoxically, the traditional labels have a precision to them that, if you take the time to learn the lingo, communicates almost exactly what is in the bottle. But that did not prevent complaints.

So over the years, the German wine authorities and individual producers have tried to simplify things. Many producers now either use brand names for their moderately priced bottles, which cuts through the jargon, or at least have eliminated the gothic fonts that made labels hard to decipher even for those who were able to translate the meaning.

The rise of dry riesling in Germany over the last 20 years gave the authorities an additional incentive to make wine labels friendlier to the public. Rather than seize this chance, the Germans appear to have made their labeling rules even more confusing.

It used to be that those seeking dry German rieslings needed to keep an eye out for the word “trocken,” which means dry. But many producers, not without good reason, wanted to make distinctions between the quality of vineyard sites, so they created a Burgundy-inspired overlay that might at least suggest a geographical hierarchy for dry wines.

Picture: At Weingut Müller Catoir. See: Vineyard Tour, Cellar Tour and Tasting at Weingut Müller Catoir – Germany-South Tour by ombiasy WineTours (2015)

The problem is, the newer terminology is not consistent through all German regions. Many producers who belong to certain growers’ associations have adopted the term “grosses gewächs” to indicate dry wines from individual vineyards deemed exceptional. But that phrase is not employed in the Rheingau region, where the preferred term is “erstes gewächs.”

Meanwhile, erstes gewächs should not be confused with “erste lage,” which indicates wines from sites that aspire to grosses gewächs status but have yet to earn the designation. Nor should grosses gewächs be confused with “grosse lage,” indicating wines from top sites that are not dry. And definitely don’t confuse grosse lage with grosslage, an old term meaning that a wine comes from several vineyards in a particular town rather than one vineyard, or einzellage.

Not surprisingly, many producers choose to use the simpler trocken designation.

Perhaps it is unfair sport to remark on the confusing nature of German wine labels. But I mention it because the wine panel recently tasted 20 bottles of dry German riesling from the largely excellent 2016 vintage. The tasting was blind, which spared us from the daunting label verbiage. But anybody examining the list of our 10 favorites will require a decoding device.

For the tasting, Florence Fabricant and I were joined by Sabra Lewis, beverage director at L’Atelier de Joël Robuchon. We usually aim for two guests, but our second was a casualty of the New York region’s dysfunctional transit system, so we went ahead with just the three of us.

Although Germany’s sweet rieslings are singular and among the treasures of the wine world, its dry rieslings can be equally wonderful and are likewise unlike those from anywhere else.

Rieslings from Austria generally feel firmer, denser and more penetrating, while those from Alsace are altogether bigger and more voluminous.

If I can speak generally about dry German rieslings, which can vary considerably depending on which region they come from, they are often far more delicate in texture than the others, precise and jewel-like rather than rich.

By many accounts, difficult weather made the 2016 vintage tough to manage for many growers, but it produced wines of exceptional balance that amplify many of the best traits of dry German rieslings. The wines we liked best were deep and profoundly mineral, while also resonant and refreshing.

What do I mean by resonant? These are wines that feel three-dimensional in the mouth. They have length — their flavors proceed in a linear fashion and last long after you swallow — and depth, which suggests the sort of complexity that makes you want to taste the wine again and again in an effort to unravel the flavors.

But these are also young wines, and the more ambitious among them will benefit from aging five to 10 years to allow these complexities to uncoil while mellowing the rippling acidity. Sabra wondered whether some of them would ever relax, and suggested that maybe 20 years would do it. I don’t think it will take that long, but the best of these wines are well worth giving some time.

Not all of the wines were exceptional, however. Balance was sometimes an issue. We rejected some wines that were overbearingly acidic — punishingly tart and lacking charm. That’s an old complaint about dry German rieslings, and one I was surprised to find might still have legitimacy.

The good far outweighed the bad, however. Sabra called it a transparent vintage, meaning that the wines were quite expressive of their terroirs. And we found some excellent values, wines that are delicious right now. Top among them was our best value, a trocken from Schloss Mühlenhof in Rheinhessen — juicy, zesty and, if not complex, immensely satisfying, and just $13 for a liter.

Right behind it was the Blauschiefer trocken from Stein in the Mosel, likewise lively, juicy and stony and just $19, albeit for a 750-milliliter bottle.

Picture: Tasting with Gernot Kollmann, Weingut Immich-Batterieberg in Enkirch, Mosel. See: Tasting and Vineyard Visit at Weingut Immich-Batterieberg in Enkirch, Mosel, with Gernot Kollmann - Germany-North Tour 2017 by ombiasy WineTours

While lovely bottles, these two predictably lacked the depth and nuance of our top (and more expensive) wines. Our No. 1 bottle was the Forster Ungeheuer grosses gewächs from von Winning in the Pfalz. Earthy, lively and multidimensional, the wine is a pleasure to drink now, but will get even better with time.

If, by the way, you ever want to read some entertaining promotional wine writing, check out von Winning’s American importer, Terry Theise, who describes this wine in his 2017 catalog like this: “firm and caramelly, shiitakes, goose fat, but all in a heaving jiggling orgy of hedonism and licentiousness.” I’m afraid multidimensional is all you will get from me.

No. 2 was the Lorcher Krone from Eva Fricke in the Rheingau, tightly coiled yet graceful and full of energy. Our No. 3 bottle was the Dalsheim Hubacker grosses gewächs from Keller in Rheinhessen, rich and succulent, with apricot and mineral flavors.

Just behind these wines were the stony, tangy Haardter Herrenletten from Müller-Catoir in the Pfalz, the balanced energetic Maximin Klosterlay erste lage from Carl Loewen in the Mosel and the fresh, floral Dhroner Hofberg from A.J. Adam in the Mosel. Also well worth noting were the Marienburg Fahrlay grosses gewächs from Clemens Busch in the Mosel and the “Detonation” from Immich-Batterieberg, also in the Mosel.

It’s important to emphasize that this was a fragmentary tasting, simply a cross-section of the 2016 vintage. We did not have many bottles from the Nahe region, where the ’16s have been especially lauded; and in a land of many small producers, you can look well beyond our top 10 to find wonderful bottles.

Just know that they are well worth seeking out. And, if you are uncertain about which words indicate that a wine is dry beyond the all-purpose trocken, the alcohol level is often a dead giveaway. The sweet wines, in which all the sugar in the juice was not converted to alcohol in fermentation, are usually less than 10 percent alcohol. These dry bottles were 11.5 to 13 percent.

Picture: Annette and Christian Schiller at the Rieslingfeier 2017 in New York City with Clemens Busch. See: The Annual "Slaughterhouse" Riesling Feast in New York: Rieslingfeier 2017, USA

Tasting Dry German Rieslings

★★★½ Von Winning Pfalz Forster Ungeheuer Riesling Grosses Gewächs 2016 $56

Lively and multidimensional, with complex aromas and flavors of spices, citrus and earth. (Terry Theise Estate Selections/Skurnik Wines, New York)

★★★½ Eva Fricke Rheingau Lorcher Krone Riesling Trocken 2016 $60

Graceful, tightly coiled and energetic, with aromas and flavors of flowers, citrus and minerals. (Bonhomie Wine Imports, South Orange, N.J.)

★★★ Keller Rheinhessen Dalsheim Hubacker Riesling Grosses Gewächs 2016 $90

Rich, deep and succulent, with aromas and flavors of apricots and minerals. (Petit Pois/Sussex Wines, Moorestown, N.J.)

★★★ Müller-Catoir Pfalz Haardter Herrenletten Riesling Trocken 2016 $44

Stony, fresh and resonant, with tangy, earthy, herbal flavors. (Terry Theise Estate Selections/Skurnik Wines, New York)

★★★ Carl Loewen Mosel Maximin Klosterlay Riesling Trocken Erste Lage 2016 $28

Great balance and energy, with aromas and flavors of wet rocks, lime and apple. (Terry Theise Estate Selections/Skurnik Wines, New York)

★★★ A.J. Adam Mosel Dhroner Hofberg Trocken 2016 $67

Fresh and floral, with balanced flavors of peaches and minerals. (Terry Theise Estate Selections/Skurnik Wines, New York)

Best Value: ★★½ Schloss Mühlenhof Rheinhessen Riesling Trocken 2016 one liter, $13

Fresh, juicy and zesty, with spicy flavors of citrus and peach. (Savio Soares Selections, Brooklyn)

★★½ Stein Mosel Blauschiefer Riesling Trocken 2016 $19

Lively and juicy, with flavors of peach, orange and wet stones. (Vom Boden, Brooklyn)

★★½ Clemens Busch Mosel Marienburg Fahrlay Riesling Grosses Gewächs 2016 $71

Fresh and delineated, with aromas and flavors of minerals, flowers and citrus. (Louis/Dressner Selections, New York)

★★½ Immich-Batterieberg Mosel Riesling Trocken “Detonation” 2016 $28

Zesty, with aromas and flavors of citrus, salt and flowers. (Louis/Dressner Selections, New York)

schiller-wine: Related Postings

UPCOMING Tours/ Wine Dinners/ Tastings - Annette and Christian Schiller/ ombiasyPR & WineTours/ schiller-wine, Germany, France, USA (Issued: July 2, 2018)

Ombiasy Wine Tours 2018: 3 x France and 3 x Germany - Ombiasy Newsletter December 2017

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