Monday, August 21, 2017

Bandol Wine Dinner at DBGB DC Kitchen and Bar, Washington DC

Pictures: Presenting the Domaine de la Bastide Blanche AOC Bandol Wines: Cason Love (Weygandt Wines), Ed Jenks (Weygandt Wines), Andrew Wooldridge (Head Sommelier DBGB DC) and Damien Lehaux (Opici Family Distributing)

In July 2017, I spent a week in the Provence in France with my wife Annette and son Benjamin with his children Lorelei and Otto; Oskar, our German Shepard, also came along. Our base was in LaCiotat, which is between Cassis and Bandol. I wrote about it here:

Wining and Dining in the Provence, France, 2017

Back in Washington DC, I was delighted to receive an invitation for a dinner at Daniel Boulud's DBGB DC Kitchen and Bar with the wines of one of Bandol's premier producer, Domaine de la Bastide Blanche.

Picture: Daniel Boulud's DBGB DC Kitchen and Bar

Invitation

On Thursday, August 10th, starting at 7:00pm join Weygandt Wines & Sommelier Andrew Wooldridge at DBGB DC for a Provençal Wine Dinner featuring wines from the Peter Weygandt portfolio.

Guests at this special event will be treated to a reception featuring a delicious Rosé from a newcomer to the Weygandt Wines portfolio, Clos de l'Ours, followed by an elegant four-course dinner, complete with wine pairings featuring the bold, flavorful Bandol wines of our own, Domaine La Bastide Blanche.

US$95 plus tax and tip.

Pictures: Bandol Wine Dinner at DBGB DC Kitchen and Bar

The Wines of the Provence

Wine has been made in the Provence for over 2600 years, making Provence the oldest wine producing region of France. It is also the only French wine region to focus on Rosé. Two thirds of the wines from the Provence are Rosé.

Picture: Provence AOC (Wine Folly)

(Source: wikipedia): Provence is the oldest wine producing region of France. The wines of Provence were probably introduced into Provence around 600 BC by the Greek Phoceans who founded Marseille and Nice. After the Roman occupation, in 120 BC the Roman Senate forbade the growing of vines and olives in Provence, to protect the profitable trade in exporting Italian wines, but in the late Roman empire retired soldiers from Roman Legions settled in Provence and were allowed to grow grapes.

Provence is also the only French wine region that predominantly produces rosé wines. The most characteristic grape is mourvèdre, used most famously in the red wines of Bandol. Cassis is the only area in Provence known for its white wines.

The wines of Provence are grown under demanding conditions; hot weather and abundant sunshine (Toulon, near Bandol, has the most sunshine of any city in France) which ripens the grapes quickly; little rain, and the mistral.

Picture: Rosé Wines Account for 80% of the Wines of the Provence. Here: Carrefour in La Ciotat.

The AOCs of the Provence

AOC Côtes de Provence is the largest AOC ihe Provence, accounting for about 75% of the total. The appellation covers 20,300 hectares. 80 percent of the production is rosé wine.

Second in size, the AOC Coteaux d'Aix-en-Provence was classified as an AOC in 1985. There are 4000 hectares in production. 70 percent of the wines are rosés.

The AOC Coteaux Varois en Provence is a recent AOC in Provence (1993). 2200 hectares. 80 percent rosés.

AOC Bandol AOC is produced by 8 communes with silicon & limestone soils. Those soils and the warm, coastal climate are ideally suited for the late ripening Mourvèdre grape, which is the major variety. For both the red and rosé wines, Mourvèdre must account for at least 50% of the blend, though most producers will use significantly more, with Grenache and Cinsaut usually completing the composition. Syrah and Carignan are restricted in Bandol to a maximum of 15% of the blend or 10% individually.

Nearly 70% of the production is red wine with rosé and a small amount of white wine making up the remainder. Red Bandol wine is characterized by its dark color with rich flavors of black fruit, vanilla, cinnamon and leather.

Bandol is the only French wine that is dominated by the Mourvèdre grape, which expresses differently depending on the particular terroir of the region. The soils in the northwest region, from the communes of Évenos to Saint-Cyr-sur-Mer, are composed of small pebbles and produce lighter, more delicate wines. On the red clay that is scattered throughout the region, the wine produced is very tannic and must be tempered with increased blending of Cinsaut and Grenache. The Grenache grape itself is typically planted on cooler north facing slopes to prevent the grape from over ripening and making the wine highly alcoholic. The relative infertility of the soil throughout the region helps to keep yields low with the Bandol region having some of the lowest yields in France. The use of mechanical harvesting is impractical due to the style of terracing used on the hillsides and is prohibited by the rules of the AOC.

Pictures: AOC Bandol

AOC Cassis was the first wine in Provence to be classified as an AOC in 1936, and is best known for its white wines.

AOC Bellet - At the time of the French Revolution, the little town of Saint Roman de Bellet (now part of Nice) was the center of an important wine region. Today the region is one of the smallest in France; just 47 hectares.

AOC Palette Palete is a little village 4 kilometres east of Aix-en-Provence.

AOC Les Baux de Provence was established as an AOC for red and rosé wines in 1995.

The Grape Varieties in the Provence

(winerist): The key grape variety for reds and roses in Provence is Mourvèdre, also known as Monastrell. Mourvèdre is typically high in alcohol, high in tannins and has typical aromas of dark berries. Mourvèdre is often blended with Grenache and Cinsault. Bandol, is the most famous appellation for powerful, gamey red made from Mourvèdre.

Grenache, originally from Spain, provides greater body and fullness to red wines. Cinsault - native to Provence is fresh and subtle, is an important component in most rosé wines and the grapes can be enjoyed as raw fruit too. Tibouren, a grape with a full bouquet, is also perfect for blending in red wines with other locally derived grapes.

Carignan has been a major grape for the last century in Provence blends. This variety has diminished somewhat but is still used to provide full bodied brightly coloured wines. Syrah and Cabernet Sauvignon are becoming more popular due to increased global popularity, though some winemakers are being more cautious with these grapes. They provide strong tannins and spicy flavours to the wines. Other prominent grape varieties for reds and roses are are Braquet, Folle, Cinsault, Counoise, Muscardin, Terret Noir and Vaccarèse.

Of the white varieties, Rolle (Vermentino) is grown widely in Provence, a very hardy grape boasting pear and citrus aromas. It is full bodied and very smooth. Clairette, ancient and aromatic this oddly shaped grape is a rare delight. Ugni Blanc is clear and fruity, for an elegant glass. Semillion is used in small amounts for a strong floral and honey bouquet.

The major white wine grapes of Provence often feature Bourboulenc, Grenache Blanc, Sauvignon Blanc, Marsanne, Spagnol, Mayorquin, Pignero, Picpoul and Muscat. Some of the most compelling white wines of Provence are made in Cassis, but these rarely make it outside the country due to high local demand.

Bandol

(Lonely Planet): Bandol’s old fishing-port charm has long since been swallowed up by its high-rise seaside apartment blocks, but the plentiful restaurants, cheap-and-cheerful shops and copious beach facilities make it a favourite for holidaymakers from nearby Toulon and Marseille. For everyone else, it’s probably best for a quick lunch stop or a spot of wine tasting rather than an overnight stay.

Pictures: Dinner in Bandol. See: Wining and Dining in the Provence, France, 2017

Daniel Boulud

Daniel Boulud is a French chef and restaurateur with restaurants in New York City, Washington D.C., Las Vegas, Palm Beach, Miami, Montreal, Toronto, London, Singapore, and Boston. He is best known for Daniel, his eponymous, Michelin 2-star restaurant in New York City.

While raised on a farm outside of Lyon and trained by renowned French chefs, Boulud made his reputation in New York, first as a chef and most recently a restaurateur. His restaurants include Daniel, DB Brasserie, Café Boulud, DB Bistro Moderne, Bar Boulud, DBGB Kitchen & Bar, and Boulud Sud in New York City.

Pictures: Chef Daniel Boulud and Andrew Wooldridge, DBGB DC Head Sommelier. See: Dinner at Chef Daniel Boulud's DBGB DC with the Wines of Tablas Creek Vineyard in Paso Robles and Château de Beaucastel in the Rhone Valley, USA/ France

Andrew Wooldridge, Head Sommelier

Raised in Colorado and educated in Texas, Andrew Wooldridge initially studied entrepreneurship and international business before pursuing a culinary education at the Cordon Bleu in Paris. Upon his return to the United States, he began working as a chef at a winery.

For a time, Andrew Wooldridge shifted to the world of advertising and even earned a Masters in Humanities from the University of Chicago. Throughout that time, his exposure to wine was simmering under the surface, so he headed west to pursue wine classes at the Culinary Institute of America’s Greystone campus. By the time he moved to D.C. in 2014, he had keenly honed his taste buds. Before joining DBGB DC as Head Sommelier, Andrew Wooldridge opened the buzzy French bistro Chez Billy Sud in Georgetown and worked at The Inn at Little Washington.

Bandol Wine Dinner at DBGB DC

Reception

Domaine Clos de L'Ours, Milia, Rosé, 2016

Domaine Clos de L'Ours is a newcomer to the Weygandt Wines portfolio.

In 2012 the Brotons family made a life-changing decision to realize their dream: After selling everything, they bought the Clos de l'Ours. The family now wishes to share their wine passion and make Clos de l'Ours a hedonistic lair. That's why they have opened six charming guest rooms overlooking the estate. The vineyard has been organic since 2000. 32 acres. AOC Côtes de Provence.




Domaine de la Bastide Blanche, Bandol

In the early '70s Michel and Louis Bronzo (the latter on the board of the INAO) acquired the property of the Bastide Blanche, with an eye to producing from appellation Bandol wines the equal of more famous appellations like Châteauneuf. Their painstaking efforts were rewarded in 1993 when vintage conditions created the benchmark year to put Bandol in general and Bastide-Blanche, in particular, on the map of top producers in France.

They have various cuvées, depending on the vintage, but always about 75% Mourvèdre as a minimum, up to 100% Mourvèdre for the Cuvée Fontanieu from a parcel of that name near the Mediterranean. Also, common each year to their success are their very low yields, never more than 34 or 35 hl/ha, and simply impeccable cellar conditions and attention. This shows in the pure, well-delineated fruit, that has become a hallmark of Bastide-Blanche. They also make a delightful Rose, from predominantly Mourvèdre, with Grenache and Cinsault.

Dinner


Citrus Marinated Maryland Fluke
compressed melon, lemon verbena, tapioca, borage


Domaine de la Bastide Blanche, Bandol, Blanc, 2015


Monkfish and Lobster Bourride
summer vegetables mosaic, garlic crouton, chive blossom


Domaine de la Bastide Blanche, Bandol, Rosé, 2016


Pennsylvania Lamb Duo
braised shank, roasted loin, fairytale eggplant, red pepper,
fennel polenta, rosemary-smoked garlic jus


Domaine de la Bastide Blanche, Bandol, Cuvée Estagnol, 2013
Domaine de la Bastide Blanche, Bandol, Cuvée Fontaneou, 2013


Coupole Goat Cheese
summer truffle, hazelnut butter toast


Mignardises


Chocolate


Sommelier Andrew Wooldridge Winemaker Dinner Series at Daniel Boulud's DBGB DC

This dinner was part of Sommelier Andrew Wooldridge Winemaker Dinner Series at Daniel Boulud's DBGB DC. See also:

Dinner at Chef Daniel Boulud's DBGB DC with the Wines of Tablas Creek Vineyard in Paso Robles and Château de Beaucastel in the Rhone Valley, USA/ France

Franck Pascal Biodynamic Champagne Dinner at Daniel Boulud's DBGB Kitchen and Bar in Washington DC, USA/ France

schiller-wine: Related Postings

Wining and Dining in the Provence, France, 2017 

Heads up for the 2017 Tours - to Germany and France - by ombiasy WineTours

Germany-East Tour 2017 by ombiasy WineTours: Wine, Art, Culture, History

Burgundy (and Champagne) 2016 Tour by ombiasy WineTours: From Lyon to Reims - Wine, Food, Culture and History

Bordeaux Tour by ombiasy WineTours 2016, France

Dinner at a Bouchon - Chez Paul - in Lyon: Schiller’s Favorite Bouchons in Lyon, France

Friday, August 18, 2017

Martin Zwick's BerlinKabinettCup 2017: Germany's Best 2016 Riesling Kabinett Wines

Pictures: The Top 3 Wines of the BerlinKabinettCup 2017

The BerlinKabinettCup 2017 took place in Berlin, Germany, a few weeks ago, orchestrated by Martin Zwick. 47 German Riesling Kabinett 2016 wines were included and ranked in the tasting. 2/3 of the wines came from the Mosel Saar Ruwer area. The wines were blind-tasted by 11 wine experts, including Winemaker Kai Schätzel of Weingut Schätzel and Sales Director Desire Schröder of Weingut Dr. Loosen.

Martin Zwick and his Berlin Cups

Martin Zwick was initially known for organizing the BerlinRieslingCup. The BerlinRieslingCup is about Germany’s ultra-premium dry grand cru (Grosses Gewächs) Rieslings from Grosse Lage vineyards. It typically takes place in the second half of September, following the release of the Grosses Gewächs wines of the previous year.

In the following years, he added 3 other Berlin Cups: The BerlinGutsrieslingCup, which reviews and rates entry-level Rieslings. The BerlinKabinettCup: A ranking of off-dry, light Rieslings that carry the Kabinett predicate. Finally, the BerlinSpätburgunderCup, a ranking of German Pinot Noirs.

Thus, there are now 4 BerlinCups: BerlinRieslingCup, BerlinGutsRieslingCup, BerlinKabinettCup and BerlinSpätburgunderCup. See more below.

Pictures: Martin Zwick, Berlin Cups, with Guiseppe Lauria, Editor-in-Chief of Weinwisser

What is a Kabinett?

What is a Kabinett? That depends.

In the framework of the standard classification of German wine (the Law of 1971), a Kabinett is defined by the sugar content of the grapes at harvest. It is a wine made from grapes harvested with a sugar content of 67 to 87 degrees Öchsle that was not chaptalized. Such a wine can be fully fermented and become dry. These are the Kabinett Trocken wines.

Alternatively, the winemaker could stop the fermentation so that natural sugar remains in the finished wine (and perhaps add a bit of sterilized juice – Süssreserve) to produce a wine that is fruity-sweet.

Depending on the ripeness of the grapes (i.e. the sugar content at harvest) and the timing of the winemaker for stopping the fermentation (early or late during the fermentation process), fruity-sweet Kabinett wines can range from lightly-sweet (halbtrocken, feinherb) to fully-sweet. The law of 1971 does not define any limits for the sweetness of a Kabinett wine and thus you find a wide sweetness range in the market. What they all have in common is that they are rather light wines, with a low alcohol level, made with grapes that were picked early in the harvest.

The VDP producers have introduced a new classification, very much based on the Burgundian approach. In their new classification, Kabinett no longer stands for a certain ripeness of the grapes at harvest, but stands for a certain sweetness level of the wine in the bottle.

For the VDP producers, Kabinett is an indication of a certain sweetness profile. Only wines that have a certain sweetness in the finished wine can be sold as Kabinett. Kabinett Trocken does not exist for VDP producers (although some VDP members still produce Kabinett trocken during a transition period). With a few exceptions, all the wines sold as Kabinett are fruity-sweet and in in a certain sweetness range. Auslese is sweeter than Spätlese and Spätlese sweeter than Kabinett. The terms “Halbtrocken” and “Feinherb” have become redundant in the VDP classification system.

The wines in the BerlinKabinettCup 2016 were all wines where the fermentation was interrupted to generate a wine “that dances” as Stephen Rheinhardt put it in the Süddeutschen Zeitung: A low alcohol wine with some remaining sweetness, no Trocken Kabinetts.

Martin Zwick: I made this "BerlinKabinettCup" not because of another Cup, not because of ranking, not because of scores. The true star is the KABINETT. Here in Germany Kabinett was heavily overlooked in the last years, as most people drank trocken, trocken, trocken. My "BerlinKabinettCup" created awareness in Germany for Kabinett and now the people buy more Kabinett. That´s all about.

Ranking - BerlinKabinettCup 2017

1. 2016 von Othegraven „Kupp“
2. 2016 Emrich-Schönleber „Monzinger“
3. 2016 Hofgut Falkenstein „Euchariusberg“ #12

Pictures: Günther Jauch, Owner, his Wife and Andreas Barth, Managing Director, Weingut von Othegraven

Picture: Tasting at Weingut Emrich-Schönleber in Monzingen, Nahe, with Frank Schönleber. See:  was our host. See: Germany-North Tour 2017 by ombiasy WineTours: Quintessential German Riesling and the Northernmost Pinot Noir

Picture: Johannes Weber of Hofgut Falkenstein at the 2017 Rieslingfeier in New York City. See: The Annual "Slaughterhouse" Riesling Feast in New York: Rieslingfeier 2017, USA

4. 2016 Schloss Lieser „Brauneberger Juffer“
5. 2016 Keller „Pettenthal“
6. 2016 Loersch „Hofberg“
7. 2016 Fritz Haag "Brauneberger"
8- 2016 von Othegraven „Altenberg“
9. 2016 Maximin Grünhaus „Herrenberg“
10. 2016 Wagner-Stempel "Siefersheimer"

Pictures: Tasting at Weingut Schloss Lieser in Lieser with Owner/ Winemaker Thomas Haag – Germany-North Tour by ombiasy WineTours 2016

Picture: Annette Schiller, Julia and Klaus Peter Keller at the 2015 Rieslingfeier in New York, see: A German Riesling Feast in New York City: Rieslingfeier 2015, USA

Picture: With Oliver Haag, Weingut Fritz Haag, Brauneberg, Mosel, in the Brauneberger Sonnenuhr Vineyard. See: Germany-North Tour 2017 by ombiasy WineTours: Quintessential German Riesling and the Northernmost Pinot Noir

Picture: With Owner Dr. Carl von Schubert at Weingut Maximin Grünhaus in Mertersdorf, Ruwer, Mosel. See: Germany-North Tour 2017 by ombiasy WineTours: Quintessential German Riesling and the Northernmost Pinot Noir

Picture: Annette Schiller with Daniel Wagner, Weingut Wagner-Stempel. See: VDP.Rheinhessen Invited to a Gala Dinner: The World Class Wines of the VDP.Rheinhessen Winemakers and the World Class Food of Philipp Stein (1 Star Michelin, Favorite), with Klaus Peter Keller, Philipp Wittmann, H.O.Spanier, Caroline Gillot-Spanier and Other Rheinhessen Stars

11. Maximin Grünhäuser Abtsberg
12. Franz Keller - Schwarzer Adler Oberbergener Bassgeige
13. Willi SchaeferGraacher Himmelreich
14. Weiser-Künstler Wolfer Sonnenlay
15. K. J. Thul Schieferklang
16. Schätzel Niersteiner Pettenthal
17. Max Ferd. Richter Brauneberger Juffer
18. Daniel Vollenweider Wolfer Goldgrube
19. Schätzel KabiNett
20. Reinhold Haart Piesporter Goldtröpfchen

21. Hofgut Falkenstein Krettnacher Euchariusberg #8
22. Koenen Kabinett
23. Franzen „Calmont“
24. Dr. Hermann Ürziger Würzgarten
25. Clemens Busch Pündericher Marienburg
26. Willi Schaefer Graacher Domprobst
27. Gunderloch Nackenheimer Rothenberg.
28. Hofgut Falkenstein Krettnacher Euchariusberg
29. Kruger-Rumpf Im Pitterberg
30. Steinmetz & Hermann Wintricher Geierslay

31. Nico Espenschied La Roche
32. Max Ferd. Richter Elisenberger
33. Dr. Hermann Erdener Treppchen
34. Schloss Lieser Wehlener Sonnenuhr
35. Gunderloch Jean Baptiste
36. Thörle Saulheimer Hölle
37. Dr. Loosen Wehlener Sonnenuhr
38. Schmitges „vom roten Schiefer“
39. Carl Loewen Maximiner Herrenberg
40. Felix Waldkirch Rhodter Schlossberg

41. Steinmetz Mülheimer Sonnenlay
42. Reichsgraf von Kesselstatt Scharzhofberger
43. Zilliken Saarburger Rausch
44. Strub „Herzstück“
45. Zilliken Ockfener Bockstein
46. Weegmüller Pamino
47. von Hövel Scharzhofberger Versteigerung

The Tasters

Desiree Schröder/Dr. Loosen
Dorit Schmitt/Chefredakteurin
Kai Schätzel/Winzer
Olivier Schnurr/Mosel-Freak
Ulrich Amling/Tagesspiegel
Marcel Saveedra/Sommelier
André WieWo/Weintauschbörse
Marcus Reinhardt/Sommelier
Shahzad Talukder/Sommelier
René Arnold/Sommelier + Weinhändler
Nikolai L./Auswerter+ Wein-Freak

schiller-wine: Related Postings (Berlin Cups)

Germany’s Best Ultra-premium Dry Riesling Wines - BerlinRieslingCup 2017, Germany 
Germany’s Best Ultra-premium Dry Riesling Wines - BerlinRieslingCup 2015, Germany
Germany’s Best Ultra-premium Dry Riesling Wines - BerlinRieslingCup 2014, Germany
Germany’s Best Ultra-premium Dry Riesling Wines - BerlinRieslingCup 2013, Germany
Germany’s Ultra Premium Dry Riesling Wines – The Berlin Riesling Cup 2012
Germany’s Top Wines – The Berlin Riesling Cup 2011 Ranking

Martin Zwick’s BerlinGutsrieslingCup 2016 - Rating Dry Entry-level Rieslings from Germany's Best Producers
Martin Zwick’s BerlinGutsrieslingCup 2015 - Rating Dry Entry-level Rieslings from Germany's Best Producers
Martin Zwick’s BerlinGutsrieslingCup 2014 - Rating Entry-level Rieslings from Germany's Best Producers
BerlinGutsrieslingCup 2013 – Rating Entry-level Rieslings from Germany
Berlin Gutsriesling Cup 2012, Germany

Martin Zwick's BerlinKabinettCup 2017: Germany's Best 2016 Riesling Kabinett Wines
Martin Zwick's BerlinKabinettCup 2016: Germany's Best 2015 Riesling Kabinett Wines
Martin Zwick's BerlinKabinettCup 2015: Germany's Best 2014 Riesling Kabinett Wines
Martin Zwick's BerlinKabinettCup 2014, Germany
BerlinKabinettCup 2013 - Kabinett 2012, Germany

Germany's Best Pinot Noir Wines - BerlinSpätburgunderCup 2013/2015
Germany's Best Pinot Noir Wines - BerlinSpätburgunderCup 2012/2014
BerlinSpaetburgunderCup 2011/2013, Germany

schiller-wine: Related Postings

Heads up for the 2017 Tours - to Germany and France - by ombiasy WineTours 

Germany-North Tour 2017 by ombiasy WineTours: Quintessential German Riesling and the Northernmost Pinot Noir

The Annual "Slaughterhouse" Riesling Feast in New York: Rieslingfeier 2017, USA

A German Riesling Feast in New York City: Rieslingfeier 2015, USA

VDP.Rheinhessen Invited to a Gala Dinner: The World Class Wines of the VDP.Rheinhessen Winemakers and the World Class Food of Philipp Stein (1 Star Michelin, Favorite), with Klaus Peter Keller, Philipp Wittmann, H.O.Spanier, Caroline Gillot-Spanier and Other Rheinhessen Stars

Thursday, August 17, 2017

Weingut Georg Müller Stiftung in Hattenheim, Rheingau: Cellar Tour, Art Tour, Tasting and Vineyard Tour with Winemaker Tim Lilienström - Germany-North Tour 2017 by ombiasy WineTours

Picture: Tasting at Weingut Georg Müller Stiftung with Tim Lilienström

Weingut Georg Müller Stiftung in Hattenheim in the Rheingau was our first stop of the Germany-North Tour 2017 by ombiasy WineTours. It was an excellent start of the tour. Winemaker Tim Lilienström was our host.

We began the visit with a tour of the winemaking facility, followed by a visit of the art cellar and a sit-down tasting. At the end, on the way to Kloster Eberbach, Tim Lilienström showed us the vineyards of Weingut Georg Müller Stiftung.

Thanks you very much Tim.

Pictures: Winemaker and General Manager Tim Lilienström Welcoming us at Weingut Georg Müller Stiftung in Hattenheim

Weingut Georg Müller Stiftung

This wine estate in the heart of the Rheingau, the charming town of Hattenheim, was established in 1882 by Georg Müller, co-owner of the famous sparkling wine house Matheus Müller in Eltville. He also was one of the founders of the VDP. In 1913 Georg Müller donated the wine estate to his home town Hattenheim. He transformed it into a foundation (Stiftung), and the profits were used to support the poor and other charitable causes.

In 2003 the estate was privatized and Peter Winter, chairman of the board of one of the largest wine companies in the world, purchased the winery. He invested heavily, hired an ambitious cellar master, and brought the estate back to its former glory. As an aficionado of the arts Peter Winter uses the 250 years old vaulted wine cellar as a modern art gallery. The modern art on display and the historic cellar make for an impressive, extraordinary exciting exhibition space.

Pictures: In the Wine Cellar with Tim Lilienström

The Art Cellar

The cellar of Weingut Georg Müller Stiftung has become in part a museum. Most of the modern art exhibited in the cellar was produced specifically for the wine cellar. The climatic conditions in the cellar needed to be taken into account in creating the art. Consequently, the sculptors and painters typically worked with stone, metal, silicon or plastic and painted behind glass, Plexiglas or on MDF panels.

It is a fascinating setting down there in the cellar: a large space of about 1000 m2 and 250 years old. It can be used for various purposes, including receptions and wine tastings.

Pictures: In the Art Cellar of Weingut Georg Mueller Stiftung

Peter Winter

When you spent an afternoon at Peter Winter’s Weingut Georg Mueller Stiftung in Hattenheim in the Rheingau, you are a bit reminded of Donald Hess. Donald Hess and Peter Winter appear to be on the same journey, that of wine and art.

See:
Wine, Art and Food: Donald Hess’ Glen Carlou Estate in South Africa
A Painted Winetasting at Weingut Georg Mueller Stiftung in Hattenheim (Eltville), Rheingau, Germany

Picture: Christian Schiller and Peter Winter at Weingut Georg Müller Stiftung

Peter Winter’s journey started in 2003, when he purchased the Weingut Georg Müller Stiftung. Before that turning point in life, Peter Winter was for over 40 years in various key positions in the German wine industry. Importantly, for 18 years he was the Chairman of the Board of one of the ten largest wine companies worldwide. He is also President of the German Wine Exporter Association and teaches at the University of Geisenheim.

What Tim Poured

Art Cellar Tour

2013 Weingut Georg Müller Stiftung Hattenheimer Rheingarten Riesling Sekt Brut


2015 Weingut Georg Müller Stiftung Hattenheimer Riesling trocken VDP.Ortswein
2015 Weingut Georg Müller Stiftung Hattenheimerer Engelsmannsberg Riesling feinherb VDP.Erste Lage
2013 Weingut Georg Müller Stiftung Hattenheimerer Wisselbrunnen Riesling Spätlese VDP.Grosse Lage
2015 Weingut Georg Müller Stiftung Edition PW Frühburgunder trocken


2006 Weingut Georg Müller Stiftung Hattenheimerer Schützenhof Riesling Beerneauslese VDP.Erste Lage


Seated Tasting

2016 Weingut Georg Müller Stiftung Riesling trocken VDP.Gutswein
2016 Weingut Georg Müller Stiftung Sweish Summer trocken VDP.Gutswein (Müller-Thurgau + Scheurebe + Sauvignon Blanc)
2015  Weingut Georg Müller Stiftung Hattenheimerer Schützenhof Riesling trocken VDP.Erste Lage
2015 Weingut Georg Müller Stiftung Hattenheimerer Nussbrunnen Riesling GG VDP.Grosse Lage
2015 Weingut Georg Müller Stiftung Hattenheimerer Hassel Riesling Auslese Goldkapsel VDP.Grosse Lage

Barrique

2015 Weingut Georg Müller Stiftung Auxerrois trocken VDP.Gutswein
2015 Weingut Georg Müller Stiftung Edition PW Spätburgunder trocken VDP.Gutswein
2015 Weingut Georg Müller Stiftung Daniel Spätburgunder trocken VDP.Gutswein

Pictures: Tasting with Tim Lilienström

In the Vineyards

At the end of the visit, on the way to Kloster Eberbach, Tim Lilienström showed us the vineyards of Weingut Georg Müller Stiftung.

The estate covers an area of approximately 12 hectares with excellent vineyard locations such as Schützenhaus, Engelmannsberg, Hassel, Wisselbrunnen, Nussbrunnen or Heiligenberg. Of the vineyards on the wine-growing estate approximately 80% grow Riesling and approximately 15% grow Spätburgunder in an environmentally sustainable way. Frühburgunder, Müller Thurgau, Auxerrois und Ehrenfelser are grown in the remaining vineyards.

Bottle production is 100 000.

Pictures: In the Vineyards of Weingut Georg Müller Stiftung with Tim Lilienström

Postings: Germany-North Tour 2017 by ombiasy WineTours: Quintessential German Riesling and the Northernmost Pinot Noir (Posted and Forthcoming)

Germany-North Tour 2017 by ombiasy WineTours: Quintessential German Riesling and the Northernmost Pinot Noir

Weingut Georg Müller Stiftung (VDP) in Hattenheim, Rheingau: Cellar Tour, Art Cellar Tour, Tasting and Vineyard Tour

Lunch and Tour at Kloster Eberbach and Tour and Tasting at Weingut Kloster Eberbach, Rheingau
 
Visit and Tasting at Weingut Schloss Vollrads (VDP) in Oestrich-Winkel, Rheingau

Vineyard tour, cellar tour and tasting at Weingut Leitz in Rüdesheim, Rheingau

Visit and tasting at Weingut Ratzenberger (VDP) in Bacharach, Mittelrhein, with Jochen Ratzenberger

Cruise on the Rhine River from Lorch to Boppard, Mittelrhein

Visit and tasting at Weingut Heymann-Lösenstein (VDP) in Winningen, Mosel, with Richard Löwenstein

Tasting Pinot Noir at Weingut Kreuzberg in Dernau, Ahr

Visit and tasting at Weingut Jean Stodten, in Rech, Ahr, with Alexander Stodten

Tasting at Weingut Markus Molitor in Haus Klosterberg, Mosel

Tasting and Vineyard Visit at Weingut Immich-Batterieberg in Enkirch, Mosel, with Gernot Kollmann

The Wines of the Berncasteler Doctor, Bernkastel-Kues in the Mosel Valley, Germany

Wining in Bernkastel-Kues in the Mosel Valley: Wine Tavern “Spitzhaeuschen”, Germany

Tasting and Vineyard Walk at Weingut Fritz Haag (VDP) in Brauneberg, Mosel, with Oliver Haag

Dinner at the 2 Michelin star restaurant Schanz in Piesport, Mosel

Schiller’s Favorite Wine Taverns in Trier, Germany

Visit and tasting at Weingut Maximin Grünhaus (VDP) in Mertersdorf, Ruwer, Mosel, with Dr. Carl von Schubert 

Visit and tasting at Weingut von Hövel (VDP) in Oberemmel, Saar, Mosel, with Max von Kunow

Tasting at Weingut Emrich-Schoenleber (VDP) in Monzingen, Nahe, with Frank Schönleber

Wine-pairing Lunch at Landgasthof Zur Traube in Meddersheim, Nahe, with Petra Hexamer and the wines of Weingut Hexamer.

Dinner with Wine Pairing the Restaurant of Weingut Kruger-Rumpf in Münster-Sarmsheim, Nahe, with Corenlia, Stefan and Georg Rumpf

Tasting at Weingut J.B. Becker, in Walluf, Rheingau, with Hajo Becker

Lunch at Gutsausschank-Ristorante Weingut von Oetinger in Erbach, Rheingau