Wednesday, January 30, 2013

Union des Grands Crus de Bordeaux (UGCB) on North America Tour in Washington DC - Schiller’s Favorites

Picture: Christian G.E. Schiller with Olivier Bernard of Domaine de Chevalier in Washington DC. Olivier Bernard is also the President of the UGCB 

The UGCB toured North America with stops in 7 American and Canadian cities, including in Washington DC on January 24.

The 2013 UGCB tastings awarded guests the opportunity to taste more than 100 different 2010 Bordeaux wines, as well as meet and talk with the owners/senior managers of the chateaux that produce the wine.

Pictures: UGCB Tasting in Washington DC

These were all premium wine producers, but the crème de la crème was not there. Jean-Bernard Grenie, owner of Château Angélus, told me a few days ago that they have left the UGCB. “At the level where we are now, we cannot show up here with 100 other producers.” Château Angélus is - newly promoted – one of only 4 Premier Grand Cru Classé A, AOC Saint Emilion Grand Cru producers, the top category in the Saint Emilion Classification.

UGCB Tasting in Washington DC (January 24, 2013)

After a decade of absence, the UGCB returned to Washington D.C. Pearson's Wine and Spirits hosted the UGCB at the Willard Intercontinental Hotel's Grand Ballroom. That the UGCB North America Tour included a stop in Washington DC was due to the tireless efforts of David Choi, Proprietor of Pearson's Wine and Spirits. “We've been working for over two years to bring this tasting event back to Washington.” David said.

As part of the tasting, David Choi had set up a Bordeaux Futures Table, where people could directly order the 2010 en primeur through Pearson's Wine and Spirits.

Pictures: David Choi, Proprietor of Pearson's Wine and Spirits and Annette Schiller, Ombiasy Wine Tours, at the Check-in

See also: 
Union des Grands Crus de Bordeaux Returning to Washington DC, USA

2010 Vintage

The 2010 Bordeaux vintage has received tremendous press from the world's most influential critics on Bordeaux wines:

Robert Parker: "I have tasted enough wines from 2005, 2009 and 2010 to realize that these may be the three greatest Bordeaux vintages I have tasted in my career”.

James Suckling: "The 2010 vintage is clearly a great vintage, with dozens of exceptional wines. Some of the baby reds are chateaux's best ever, or best in decades. They will be must buys for Bordeaux lovers around the world."

Stephen Spurrier, Decanter Magazine: “2010, the greatest Bordeaux vintage in modern times….” and "Producers and critics are resisting saying 'best ever', but this focused, serious, age-worthy vintage ... is drawing comparisons to 1982 and even 1947."

James Molesworth Wine Spectator: Gave the vintage 95-98 points and called it an "Exceptional Vintage"

Neil Martin, Robert Parker’s Wine Advocate: “There are grounds for the hype…2010 is a great vintage”

UGCB

Founded in 1973 by a group of Bordeaux winegrowers, the purpose of the UGCB is to join forces in order to promote and defend the interests of its members. The UGCB consists of 135 member estates located exclusively in the most prestigious Bordeaux appellations. The UGCB has a permanent staff of 5 assisted by a public relations agency in each major market. The Union organized 50 events in 15 countries last year.

Schiller’s Favorites

Domaine de Chevalier

Represented by: Olivier Bernard and Anne Bernard

Domaine de Chevalier is Cru Classé de Graves in the AOC Pessac-Léognan. In 1983, Domaine de Chevalier was acquired by the Bernard family, leading French producers of industrial alcohol and major Bordeaux wine merchants. Domaine de Chevalier has been managed since then by Olivier Bernard, who took over the presidency of the UGCB last year. Stéphane Derenoncourt is retained as consultant oenologist.

From a property of 80 hectares, the vineyard area consists of 35 hectares of red grape varieties: 65% Cabernet Sauvignon, 30% Merlot, 2.5% Cabernet Franc, and 2.5% Petit Verdot; and 4.5 hectares of white grape varieties: 70% Sauvignon Blanc and 30% Sémillon.

The Grand Vin, Domaine de Chevalier, is annually produced in 7,000 cases of the red wine and 1,200 cases of the dry white. The red and white second wines, L'Espirit de Chevalier, has a production of 5,800 and 800 cases, respectively.

“This is the most structured and powerful DC in a long, long time. Full bodied, with polished and rich tannins and a long finish. Tasted twice.The rising star of Bordeaux? (4/ 2011) 92-95 points Stephen Tanzer's International Wine Cellar.

UGCB 2010 offer Grand Vin: US 90

Châteaux Pape Clément

Châteaux Pape Clément is part of the empire of Bernard Magrez, which comprises about 40 wineries around the world.

Picture: Christian G.E. Schiller at Châteaux Pape Clément

Château Pape Clément is a Cru Classé de Graves. The winery and vineyards are located in the commune of Pessac, in the larger Bordeaux City area.

Pape-Clément has one of the longest and best documented histories of all Bordeaux châteaux. The vineyards were planted in 1300 by Bernard de Groth, who later became Pope Clément V and moved the papacy to Avignon.

96-97 points James Suckling: "Very chewy, with wonderful blueberry and mineral character. Hints of mint too. Full and super classy. Love the texture of the tannins. Hyper-refined in texture." (4/2011)

UGCB 2010 offer: US 165

See also: 
Château Pape Clément in Pessac-Léognan and the World Wide Wine Empire of Bernard Magrez, France

Château Canon La Gaffelière

Represented by: Stephan von Neipperg

Château Canon La Gaffelière is – along with La Mondotte – the flagship of the von Neipperg portfolio. Both chateaux were promoted to the extremely closed circle of Premiers Grand Crus Classés B in the new St. Emilion classification last year.

Picture: Christian G.E. Schiller and Stephan von Neipperg in Washington DC and at Château Canon La Gaffelière

The von Neipperg family not only owns these two estates in France, but also owns/co-owns 6 other estates as well as a property in Bulgaria. Furthermore, in Germany, the brother of Count Stefan von Neipperg runs the family winery in Wuerttemberg.

Count Stefan von Neipperg hails from the German wine region of Württemberg where his family has maintained its existing vineyards since the 15th century and bottles its wine under the family label, Weingut des Grafen von Neipperg. In fact, the von Neipperg counts are descended from a noble line dating back to the Holy Roman Empire. The first record of the Count von Neipperg goes as far back as the 12th century.

94-97 points Wine Spectator Ripe and dense, but very, very sleek, with lovely polish to the texture, which lets the layers of plum sauce, blueberry and boysenberry fruit glide along. Powerful but perfumy. A beauty in the making. (3/ 2010)

UGCB 2010 offer: US$ 160

See also:
The Wine Empire of the von Neipperg Family in France, Bulgaria and Germany
Drinking the Wines of Stephane Derenoncourt at Chateau Canon la Gaffeliere in St. Emilion, Bordeaux, and at Boxwood Vineyard in Virginia, USA

Château Figeac

Represented by: Comte Eric d’ Aramon

For the past 60 years, Chateau Figeac was been associated with Thierry Manoncourt, who took over the management of the property in 1946, and his wife Marie-France; Thierry Manacourt passed away in 2010. It was under his leadership that Chateau Figeac rose to the front ranks of Saint-Émilion estates. His son-in-law Comte Eric d'Aramon took over the daily running of the estate in 1988. In 1992, Thierry Manacourt divided the business between his 4 daughters, bestowing the larger share on his eldest daughter, Laure, the wife of Comte Eric d'Aramon. 

Picture: Comte Eric d’ Aramon

The following wines are produced: Château Figeac (Saint-Emilion - Premier Grand Cru Classé B), La Grange-Neuve de Figeac (second wine) and Chateau Petit-Figeac (bought in 2002 as most of the vineyard was in the middle of their Château Figeac vineyard. The wine is now made at Château Figeac). In total, the Figeac estate amounts to 54 hectares of which 40 are planted with vines. Annual production is 10 000 cases.

94-95 points James Suckling This is very structured, with a solid core of plums, chocolate and bright acidity. Firm and silky tannins and a long, long finish. A powerful and structured young wine. (4/ 2011)

UGCB 2010 offer: US$ 280

See also:
Château Figeac, Saint-Émilion - A Profile, France

Château Poujeaux

Represented by: Matthieu Cuvelier

Château Poujeaux is in Moulis. In the 2003 classification of Cru Bourgeois wines (later annulled), Château Poujeaux was one of just nine to be placed in the highest category, Cru Bourgeois Exceptionnels.

Philippe Cuvelier, a Parisian businessman who made his fortune running Papeterie Gilbert, a paper and office supplies company, bought Chateau Poujeaux from the Theil family in 2008. Philippe Cuvelier, is not related to Didier Cuvelier. Mattheu Cuvelier is his son.

92-93 points James Suckling Love the fruity and chocolate character here, with lots spices and nutmeg. Full and velvety with soft tannins and a long finish. (4/ 2011)

UGCB 2010 offer Château Poujeaux: US$ 35

Château Franc Mayne

Represented by: Griet van Malderen Laviale

Château Franc Mayne is a Premier Grand Cru Classé B in St Emilion. Since 2005 Château Franc Mayne has been owned by Griet and Hervé Laviale. There have been major renovations both in the main house and the wine making facilities, with a new vat house containing wooden and stainless steel vats. 

Picture: Griet van Malderen Laviale and Rachel Martin, Boxwood Winery in Virginia

Griet splits her time between St. Emilion and Switzerland. She and her husband Hervé own also Chateau de Lussac and Chateau Vieux Maillet. They have 3 children.

Decanter “Lovely purity of fruit. Raspberry-cherry fragrance. Palate fresh and harmonious, the limestone terroir adding minerality. A really delightful wine. Drink 2016-2025. (17 points)”

UGCB 2010 offer: US$ 40

Châteaux Beauregard and Bastor - Lamontagne

Represented by: Michel Garat (Managing Director)

Château Beauregard is a historic estate, established in the 11th century, owned since 1991 by Crédit Foncier. The vineyard area extends 17.5 hectares with a grape variety distribution of 70% Merlot and 30% Cabernet Franc. Of the Grand vin Château Beauregard there is annually produced 50,000 to 65,000 bottles, and of the second wine Le Benjamin de Beauregard there is typically produced 25,000 to 35,000 bottles.

Picture: Annette Schiller, Ombiasy Wine Tours, and Michel Garat

“An opaque purple-colored, dense, tannic, powerful Pomerol, the 2010 Beauregard exhibits a muscular framework, abundant tannin and impressive concentration as well as sweet fruit. Atypically backward for a Pomerol, it requires 3-5 years of cellaring and should drink well for two decades." Tasted twice. Drink: 2013 - 2031. Score: 89-91 Robert Parker - The Wine Advocate # 194 May 2011

UGCB 2010 offer Château Beauregard: US$ 55

Château Bastor-Lamontagne is a first-class estate located in the commune of Preignac in Sauternes. Bastor Lamontagne has a long and colourful history - since 1936 it has been owned by Crédit Foncier. Its 50 hectares of vineyards border those of Château Suduiraut and are planted with 80% Sémillon and 20% Sauvignon Blanc.

Decanter “Lovely purity of fruit. Raspberry-cherry fragrance. Palate fresh and harmonious, the limestone terroir adding minerality. A really delightful wine. Drink 2016-2025. (17 points)”

UGCB 2010 offer Château Bastor-Lamontagne: US$ 30

Château Gazin

Represented by: Inès de Bailliencourt

The estate became the property of the Bailliencourt dit Courcols family in 1918, who remains the owners to date. The estate consists of 26 hectares with the grape varieties of 90% Merlot, 7% Cabernet Sauvignon and 3% Cabernet Franc. The annual production averages 8,000 cases of the Grand Vin Château Gazin.

Picture: Inès de Bailliencourt

The estate became the property of the Bailliencourt dit Courcols family in 1918, who remains the owners to date. The estate consists of 26 hectares with the grape varieties of 90% Merlot, 7% Cabernet Sauvignon and 3% Cabernet Franc. The annual production averages 8,000 cases of the Grand Vin Château Gazin.

93-95 points Robert Parker's Wine Advocate Another remarkable effort from Gazin, the big, powerful, dense 2010 boasts an opaque purple color along with loads of black currant and kirsch-like fruit intermixed with licorice, caramel, mocha and toasty oak. This seriously endowed, broodingly backward cuvee requires 6-8 years of cellaring and should keep for three decades or more. (5/ 2011)

UGCB 2010 offer: US$ 90

Château Le Bon Pasteur

Represented by: Dany Rolland

The “Bon Pasteur” estate grew from the determination of Hermine and Joseph Dupuy who bought it around 1920. Its area was originally quite small, with several plots of land being added as the children, Geneviève and Serge Rolland, took over the management. It reached its current size of 6.62 hectare in 1955. In 1978, the two grandsons of the estate’s founders – Jean-Daniel and Michel Rolland – became the owners. This gave birth to the modern era for Le Bon Pasteur and the start of the career for Michel Rolland. 

Picture: Dany Rolland and Veteran Wine Journalist Claire Morin-Gibourg

The Bon Pasteur estate grew from the determination of Hermine and Joseph Dupuy who bought it around 1920. Its area was originally quite small, with several plots of land being added as the children, Geneviève and Serge Rolland, took over the management. It reached its current size of 6.62 hectare in 1955. In 1978, the two grandsons of the estate’s founders – Jean-Daniel and Michel Rolland – became the owners. This gave birth to the modern era for Le Bon Pasteur and the start of the career for Michel Rolland.

92-95 points Robert Parker's Wine Advocate Michel and Dany Rolland’s flagship estate, Bon Pasteur, turned out an atypically powerful wine in 2010. It boasts a dense ruby/purple color, great fruit on the attack, mid-palate and finish, super freshness for its size, full-bodied power and lots of mulberry, caramel, mocha, earth and graphite characteristics. Give this beauty 5-7 years of cellaring (unusual for a Bon Pasteur) and drink it over the following 25 years. (5/ 2011)

UGCB 2010 offer: US$ 90

Château Coufran

Represented by: Frédéric Vicaire (son of Marie-Cécile Vicaire) and Lovely Miailhe – Conquéret (daughter of Eric Miailhe)

Château Coufran is a large Cru Bourgeois property, located 3 miles north of the St. Estèphe boundary. It is the most northerly château in the Haut-Médoc and its 76-hectare has the highest proportion of Merlot (85%) to be found in any Médoc wine. The large estate produces more than 400.000 bottles annually.

Picture: Frédéric Vicaire and Lovely Miailhe – Conquéret

In 1924, Louis Miailhe, grandfather of the current owners, Marie-Cécile Vicaire and Eric Miailhe (who took over in the 1980s), bought the estate. The Miailhe family is a well established family in Bordeaux. Marie-Cécile Vicaire and Eric Miailhe also manage Chateau Verdignan, which is also owned by the Miailhe family.

Decanter: “Deeply-extracted cassis fruit with a depth and complexity above some of its peers, fine northern Médoc with a good future. Drink 2016-25. (16 points)”

UGCB 2010 offer: US$ 24

Château Brane - Cantenac

Represented by: Corinne Conroy (Director of Communications)

Château Brane-Cantenac is a Deuxieme Grand Cru Classe en 1855 in Margaux. In 1922, it was acquired by the Lurton family. In 1992, control passed to the current owner Henri Lurton.

Picture: With Corinne Conroy (Director of Communications) in Washington DC and at Château Brane-Cantenac, with Henri Lurton

The Lurtons are one of Bordeaux's great wine dynasties. With more than 1,000 hectares in the region, they are collectively Bordeaux's largest holder of wine-producing land. The family members own more than 20 Châteaux and manage several well known properties. They are also active in the New World and the South of France.

Brane-Cantenac’s vineyard totals 94 hectares. The grape varieties are 62.5% Cabernet Sauvignon, 33% Merlot, 4% Cabernet Franc and 0.5 Carmenère.

Producing annually a total of 30,000 cases, Chateau Brane-Cantenac makes 4 wines: The Grand Vin, the second wine Baron de Brane, an additional label named Château Notton using grapes from the Notton vineyard, a plot acquired from Château d'Angludet, and a generic Margaux wine.

93-96 points Robert Parker's Wine Advocate 2010: After nearly two decades of mediocre performances, Brane Cantenac has been doing impressive work over the last decade. While the 2010 may not eclipse the 2009 or 2005, it is an exceptional wine from proprietor Henri Lurton. A dense purple color is accompanied by a floral-scented bouquet revealing notes of licorice, graphite and red as well as black currants. Layered, rich and concentrated, this impressively constructed, seamless Margaux has plenty of tannin, but it is buried under the extravagant fruit and glycerin. This rich, pure, authoritative 2010 should drink well young yet keep for 25-30+ years. (6/ 2011)

UGCB 2010 offer Grand Vin: US$ 95

UGCB 2010 offer Baron de Brane: US$ 30

See also:
Château Brane-Cantenac, Deuxieme Grand Cru Classe en 1855, Margaux – A Profile, France

Châteaux Langoa Barton and Léoville Barton

Represented by: Lilian Barton Sartorius and Mélanie Barton Sartorius (daughter of Lilian Barton Sartorius)

The Barton family, the current owners of Château Léoville-Barton and Château Langoa Barton, are able to trace their Bordeaux roots all the way back to 1722. That was the year that Thomas Barton left Ireland for Bordeaux. Like many successful owners, Barton started out as a Bordeaux negociant.

Pictures: Christian G.E. Schiller with Lilian Barton Sartorius and Mélanie Barton Sartorius

The first foray into ownership for the Barton family was in St. Estephe, with Chateau Le Boscq in 1745, which was awarded Cru Bourgeois status in 1932. In 1995, the Barton family sold it to Dourthe.

Also in 1745, the Barton family partnered with another powerful Bordeaux family to form a Bordeaux wine negociant company, Barton and Guestier. It was controlled by the Barton family until the Seagram Group got control in 1986. Today, Barton and Guestier is part of the international wine and spirit company Diageo.

The next major purchase for the Barton family took place in 1821. That was the year they bought Chateau Langoa Barton. Following the purchase of Langoa Barton, they bought a second St. Julien estate: Culled from the vineyards of Château Leoville Las Cases, that estate became Chateau Leoville Barton, a deuxième cru en 1855. Interestingly, because no wine making facilities came with the purchase, they were forced to make the wines at Château Langoa Barton. Until today, production of both wines takes place at Langoa Barton.

Château Léoville-Barton is a Deuxième Cru en 1855 in the Saint-Julien appellation.

There are now 47 hectares of vineyards at Château Léoville-Barton, planted with 72% Cabernet Sauvignon, 20% Merlot and 8% Cabernet Franc. Vinification is performed in the cellar at Langoa-Barton, as there is in fact no château at Léoville-Barton.

The grand vin is Château Léoville-Barton, the second wine is La Reserve de Léoville-Barton. Total production is 20.000 cases.

100 points Wine Enthusiast *Cellar Selection* A magnificently solid wine, initially severe. At this young stage, the tannins dominate in a wine that also reveals a full fruit salad bowl of black fruits. Very dense, concentrated, this is a wine that’s even better than the legendary 2005. The structure tells of its extraordinary aging potential: don’t even attempt to drink this for 10 years. (2/ 2013)

Château Langoa-Barton is a Troisième Cru en 1855 in the Saint-Julien appellation.

Located along the banks of the Gironde river, Langoa-Barton has 15 hectares under vine: 70% Cabernet Sauvignon, 20% Merlot, 8% Cabernet Franc, and 2% Petit Verdot.

About 7,000 cases of Château Langoa-Barton are produced.

92-95 points Wine Spectator Pure, with a gorgeous beam of dark cassis and violet racing along, while black tea, spice, tobacco and tar flitter in the background. The finish is superpolished and very, very long. (3/ 2010)

UGCB 2010 offer Léoville-Barton : US$ 135

UGCB 2010 offer Langoa-Barton : US$ 75

See more:
Fête du Bordeaux of Calvert and Woodley in Washington DC, 2012, USA

Château Léoville Poyferré

Represented by: Didier Cuvelier

The story begins in 1804 when Henri Cuvelier set out to share his great passion for fine wine with his friends of the grand bourgeoisie residing in the rich and dynamic towns of the North of France, including Lille, Boulogne Sur Mer, Arras, and Valenciennes. To this aim, he created Maison de Négoce de Vins Henri Cuvelier in Haubourdin, a wine merchant company whose success continued to develop throughout the 19th century.

Picture: Didier Cuvelier and Annette Schiller, Ombiasy Wine Tours in Washington DC and at Château Léoville-Poyferré, with Christian G.E. Schiller

The story begins in 1804 when Henri Cuvelier set out to share his great passion for fine wine with his friends of the grand bourgeoisie residing in the rich and dynamic towns of the North of France, including Lille, Boulogne Sur Mer, Arras, and Valenciennes. To this aim, he created Maison de Négoce de Vins Henri Cuvelier in Haubourdin, a wine merchant company whose success continued to develop throughout the 19th century.

100 years later, at the beginning of the 20th century, Paul Cuvelier and his young brother Albert, decided to purchase top quality estates in the Bordeaux area. They bought Château Le Crock in 1903, then Château Camensac in 1912 and finally the prestigious Château Léoville Poyferré as well as Chateau Moulin Riche in 1920.

Two of Max Cuvelier’s children have taken over the family’s activities in Bordeaux: Didier Cuvelier has been running Chateau Leoville Poyferre, Chateau Moulin-Riche and Chateau Le Crock since 1979 and Olivier Cuvelier has been managing the Wine Merchant company H. Cuvelier and Fils in Bordeaux since 1985.

In the beginning, the Cuveliers did not operate their chateaux themselves. Roger Delon, one of the owners of Chateau Leoville Las Cases was the first to manage Chateau Léoville-Poyferré. This changed in 1979 with the accession of Didier Cuvelier, who at 26 became the first member of his family to take charge of Leoville Poyferre, along with Moulin Riche and Le Crock. Didier Cuvelier put Leoville Poyferre on the map of wine lovers all over the world. Didier Cuvelier trained as a chartered accountant before passing the DUAD (a university diploma in wine tasting) in 1976.

The Grand Vin is Château Léoville-Poyferré (20000 cases). Typically the oak is 75% new each year. Wines produced from the plots once belonging to Château Moulin Riche (17000 cases) are vinified completely in cuve, before transfer into a mix of new and one-year-old barrels. The second wine is Pavillon de Poyferré.

95-98 points Robert Parker's Wine Advocate One of the prodigious wines of the vintage, the Cuvelier family has produced an outstanding 2010 that must tip the scales at 14.5+% alcohol. It boasts an opaque purple color in addition to a sweet perfume of spring flowers, black raspberries, creme de cassis and a hint of spicy oak. This seamlessly constructed St.-Julien possesses massive concentration, moderately high tannins, abundant glycerin, an unctuous texture, remarkably fresh acids and wonderful precision. It will benefit from 5-6 years of cellaring and last 30-35 years. (5/ 2011)

UGCB 2010 offer Léoville-Poyferré : US$ 165

See more:
Château Léoville-Poyferré, Chateau Le Crock, Didier Cuvelier in Bordeaux and the Cuvelier Los Andes Wines in Argentina

Château Lafon-Rochet

Château Lafon-Rochet is a Quatrièmes Grands Crus Crus en 1855 in the Saint-Estèphe appellation of the Medoc. It is one of the 5 classified properties in the appellation of Saint Estèphe. Its grounds are separated from those of Château Lafite to the north by the width of the road and from Cos d'Estournel by a dirt path.

Picture: Christian G.E. Schiller and Michel Tesseron at Château Lafon-Rochet in Saint-Estèphe

The history of Chateau Lafon-Rochet starts in the 16th century, when a portion known as Rochet (because of its rocky terrain) eventually passed by marriage to Etienne de Lafon, who established Lafon-Rochet. The estate then passed down through the Lafon generations for almost 300 years. When Guy Tesseron became the owner in 1959, it needed a serious restoration and Guy Tesseron did restore it to its former glory. Guy Tesseron was from a Chanterais family, specializing in the Cognac production.

Picture: Christian G.E. Schiller with Basil Tesseron in Washington DC

In 1975, Guy Tesseron also acquired 5th growth Chateau Pontet-Canet from the Cruse family. Both châteaux subsequently passed to the next generation with Lafon-Rochet coming to Michel Tesseron. Currently the property is in the good hands of Michel’s son, Basil Tesseron.

Lafon-Rochet's vineyards covers 45 hectares and are planted with Cabernet Sauvignon 54%, Merlot 40%, Cabernet Franc 4%, Petit Verdot 2%.

92-94 points Robert Parker's Wine Advocate - Proprietor Basile Tesseron may have produced his finest Lafon Rochet to date. The 2010s inky/blue/purple color is followed by a distinctive bouquet of spring flowers, blueberry pie, blackberry liqueur and crushed rocks. Although a classified growth, this wine is an undeniable sleeper of the vintage as its price remains reasonable. The wine possesses terrific structure, ripe tannins and a voluminous, broad, deep impression on the palate. The fruit intensity, purity and richness suggest 4-5 years of cellaring will be required and the wine will last for 20+ years. (5/ 2011)

UGCB 2010 offer: US$ 55

Château Coutet

Represented by: Aline Baly

Château Coutet is a classified estate from the Sauternes-Barsac appellation located in Barsac, owned and managed by Philippe and Dominique Baly.

Picture: Aline Baly and Annette Schiller, Ombiasy Wine Tours

The vineyard area extends 38 hectares with grape varieties of 75% Sémillon, 23% Sauvignon blanc and 2% Muscadelle.

On average 4,500 cases are produced each year of the Grand vin Château Coutet. Additionally there is produced the second wine Chartreuse de Coutet from the estate's younger vines, and a dry white wine named Vin Sec de Château Coutet.

The wine is composed of 75% Semillon, 23% Sauvignon Blanc and 2% Muscadelle. The Baly family have owned the 95 acre Chateau since 1977 when Marcel Baly acquired the 95 acre property. Marcel’s sons Dominic and Phillipe took over running the operation in the 1980′s.

Aline Baly is the third generation proprietor of Bordeaux’s first classified growth Château Coutet (AOC Barsac) and currently responsible for the estate’s strategic marketing and communications. Aline received in 2008 her Masters in Business Administration from the Kellogg School of Management (Evanston, IL, USA) with a degree focused on marketing and entrepreneurship. After 20 years of life as an ex-patriot, Aline moved back to Barsac recently.

93-96 points Wine Spectator Really ripe and fleshy, offering delicious glazed peach, apricot and honey notes, with lots of orange blossom and fig and a very rich finish. Starting to take shape now too. Impressive.

UGCB 2010 offer: US$ 85

Château Doisy Daëne

Represented by: Jean Jacques Dubourdieu

Château Doisy Daëne is as Second Cru Classé of 1855 in Barsac. The three Doisy wine estates, Château Doisy Daëne, Château Doisy-Védrines, Château Doisy-Dubroca, originate from one single estate. The Daëne part of the name comes from Jean Jacques Emmanuel Daëne, who was the vineyard owner and a wine merchant in Bordeaux, and who at some stage bought one of three portions of the estate. From 1924 Château Doisy Daëne has been owned by the Dubourdieu family. In 2000, Denis Dubourdieu took over the control of the estate. He is assisted by his sons Fabrice and Jean Jacques.

Picture: Jean Jacques Dubourdieu and Rachel Martin, Boxwood Winery in Virginia

92-94 points Robert Parker's Wine Advocate "Denis Dubourdieu’s Barsac cru has an attractive bouquet with subtle notes of cooking apple, pear and lime-flower, all with very fine delineation. The palate displays good weight and a fine thread of acidity, lending tension and poise that leads to a taut finish, showing good botrytis levels for the vintage. With its trademark minerality in place, this Doisy-Daene comes highly recommended." (5/ 2011)

UGCB 2010 offer: US$ 50

schiller-wine: Related Postings

Bordeaux Wines and their Classifications: The Basics

Château Figeac, Saint-Émilion - A Profile, France

A Glass of Bordeaux – What Else? – With Wine Journalist Panos Kakaviatos

Château Brane-Cantenac, Deuxieme Grand Cru Classe en 1855, Margaux – A Profile, France

Bordeaux Trip September 2012, France

The 5 Premiers Grands Crus Chateaux en 1855 of Bordeaux, France

The Wine Empire of the von Neipperg Family in France, Bulgaria and Germany

Tasting with Alfred Tesseron the last 10 Vintages of Château Pontet-Canet in Washington DC, USA/France

Tasting the Wines of Chateau Lafon-Rochet, Saint-Estèphe, 4ème Cru Classé en 1855, with Owner Basil Tesseron at the French Embassy in Washington DC, USA/France

Château Léoville-Poyferré, Chateau Le Crock, Didier Cuvelier in Bordeaux and the Cuvelier Los Andes Wines in Argentina

Union des Grands Crus de Bordeaux Returning to Washington DC, USA

Saint Emilion Wines and their Classification, Bordeaux, France

Château Pape Clément in Pessac-Léognan and the World Wide Wine Empire of Bernard Magrez, France

Fête du Bordeaux of Calvert and Woodley in Washington DC, 2012, USA

Drinking the Wines of Stephane Derenoncourt at Chateau Canon la Gaffeliere in St. Emilion, Bordeaux, and at Boxwood Vineyard in Virginia, USA

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